The History Practicum (HIS 3942), Spring 2019

HIS3942 1968 to Now: Political Crises and Social Protests

Instructor: Dr. Louise Newman
MWF 7 FLI 117
This course is designed to introduce students to the basic practices of historical investigation and to help students develop fundamental skills in critical reading, analytical thinking, historical research, and argumentative writing, all of which are needed to do well in the major.  Our subject matter will enable us to trace the continuities in the political, economic and cultural events that garnered headlines over the 50-year period from 1968 to 2018. Topics will include debates over the nation’s role in global affairs; economic disparities and police brutality; pending environmental crises;  governmental deceit;  fears about widespread drug use; and responses to accusations of sexual harassment/assault.

 

HIS3942 Black/Hispanic Histories

Instructor: Dr. Paul Ortiz
T/R 4/4-5 FLI 113
How does United States history look when African American and Latina/o histories are placed at the center of the national narrative? This course is a comparative exploration of Black and Hispanic experiences from the American Revolution to the present. The central theme of the course is freedom movements, liberation struggles and revolutions. We will use newspapers, memoirs, podcasts, music, and oral histories from UF Special Collections as well as secondary sources to explore Black and Hispanic resistance to the Jim Crow/Juan Crow systems of discrimination that blossomed into full-scale social movements in the 20th and 21st centuries.

 

HIS3942 The Chinese Exclusion Act
Instructor: Dr. Selda Altan
T/R 5-6/6. FLI 119
The purpose of the history practicum is to introduce students to the basics of historical theory and practice. Throughout the semester, we will work on developing fundamental skills in historical analysis, critical reading, and argumentative writing. To practice these skills, we will focus on the theme of the Chinese Exclusion Act, which can broadly be defined as a series of laws and regulations passed by Congress to prevent Chinese immigration into the U.S. in the 19th and early 20th centuries. As we discuss the causes and effects of Chinese immigration and the social implications of exclusion, students will have the chance to work with digital archives, legal documents, and visual materials.

 

HIS3942 Violence, Silence & Memory in Latin American History
Instructor: Dr. Lillian Guerra
MWF 5  CBD 210                                                                                          

This course analyzes how violence as an instrument of the state, an arm of science and the foundation of economies such as those based on slavery silenced its own existence and created, by contrast, memories of triumph, progress and “moral good” in key periods of Latin American history. Working with materials in UF Special Collections, published memoirs, films and secondary sources that recover history from memory, we study such themes as the suppression of black intellectuals, social hygiene movements of the early Twentieth Century and state terror in the military dictatorships of the Latin American Cold War.​​